PROPORTIONAL REPRESENTATION SOCIETY OF AUSTRALIA

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2017-10-16

 

The 1915 Visit by John H. Humphreys, Secretary PRS*, to

Australia, New Zealand and North America

 

-  Excerpt from Page 11 of "THE BEST SYSTEM - An account of the first hundred years of the ELECTORAL REFORM SOCIETY OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND" published to mark its centenary year, 1984. ISBN 0 903278 09 X, recounts the PRS* Secretary’s 1915 visit to Tasmania that successfully headed off a party list system being substituted for Hare-Clark for the House of Assembly, and succeeded in instituting countback for the filling of casual vacancies there.

 

-  Announcement in the Journal of the PRS* of the 1915 visit by its Secretary, Mr John H Humphreys, to Tasmania to give evidence against a proposal to substitute a Party List system for the Hare-Clark system. See his 1911 book, "Proportional Representation - A Study in Methods of Election".

 

- Exposition of Proportional Representation” - Report, in The Argus of 13th September 1915, of an exposition of proportional representation by John H. Humphreys, Secretary PRS*, on 11th September 1915, in Melbourne

 

-  Effective Voting: Proportional Representation” - Advance notice, in an article in The Argus of 14th September 1915, of the address by John H. Humphreys, Secretary PRS*, at the Melbourne Town Hall that evening

 

-  Proportional Representation and a National Parliament” - Report, in The Argus of 15th September 1915, on the address by John H. Humphreys, Secretary PRS*, at the Melbourne Town Hall, chaired by the Lord Mayor of Melbourne, Sir David Hennessy, the night before

 

-  Debate on Proportional Voting” - Report, in The Argus of 16th September 1915, of a debate between John H. Humphreys, Secretary PRS*, and T. R. Ashworth (later a member of the 1929 Royal Commission on the Constitution, which recommended PR for the Senate), on 15th September 1915, in Melbourne

 

* The Proportional Representation Society of Great Britain and Ireland was renamed Electoral Reform Society of Great Britain and Ireland in 1959, as it was increasingly felt that the original name was "too liable to suggest a connection with the continental party list systems".

 

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